Friends on a bike

I used to drive across the Continental Avenue bridge quite often back when I was a courier in  Dallas. Now it is a unique park with fountains and benches and yoga classes and lots of room to ride. It’s called the Ronald Kirk Bridge now.

Advertisements

Friends for life

I hope that fifty years from now these girls will be just like the women they just passed. What a gift to have a lifelong friend.

I snapped this shot just outside of Atocha Station in Madrid, and didn’t notice the women in the background until later.

John, saddlemaker – Wamego, Kansas

The windows were grimy and the weathered boards hadn’t seen paint in decades.

I thought the place was deserted. The windows were grimy and the weathered boards hadn’t seen paint in decades. But the sign said it was open. Inside, saddles lined the wall and harnesses and bridles dangled from pegs. John was in the workshop in back. He was friendly enough, but I was from out of town. He had grown up in the trade, learning firsthand from his dad, and knew just about everyone in the area who had ever climbed up onto a saddle.

One of his ancestors had written about the local history in the mid 1800’s and John was hoping to get it in print. His roots ran long and deep in northeast Kansas. I was just passing through. I offered to send him a print, but he didn’t seem too interested.

Check out my gallery of interesting people here.

Noelia – riding instructor

Calm, patient, but doesn’t mess around. She likes kids, but loves horses. Noelia runs the Los Nogales riding school in  Rincón de la Victoria near Málaga, Spain where my daughters took lessons for a few months. Noelia also puts on riding exhibitions, dressed up in all her Andalusian finery. I found this video on YouTube.

Check out my gallery of people at work here

Verdiales – Rural Andalusian music

Every December 28 all the bands in the area compete in a day-long festival of verdiales music.

Flowered hats, tiny cymbals, guitars, castanets, tamborines  and dancers. It’s not flamenco, but a lesser know form of Spanish folk music – verdiales. Played mainly in a few small towns around Málaga, the lyrics usually are pastoral in nature. The director starts them off with a baton, the guitars, castanets, tamborines start an unchanging rhythm, and then a singer joins in.

Every December 28 all the bands in the area compete in a day-long festival in the Puerto de la Torre fair grounds. The real fun happens in the parking lot where the members practice, eat and drink and enjoy the day, waiting for their turn on the stage.